Intranasal steroids versus placebo or no intervention for chronic rhinosinusitis.

@article{Chong2015IntranasalSV,
  title={Intranasal steroids versus placebo or no intervention for chronic rhinosinusitis.},
  author={Lee Yee Chong and Karen Head and Claire Hopkins and Carl M. Philpott and Anne G M Schilder and Martin J. Burton},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2015},
  volume={4},
  pages={
          CD011996
        }
}
BACKGROUND This review is one of six looking at the primary medical management options for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.Chronic rhinosinusitis is common and is characterised by inflammation of the lining of the nose and paranasal sinuses leading to nasal blockage, rhinorrhoea, facial pressure/pain and loss of sense of smell. The condition can occur with or without nasal polyps. The use of topical (intranasal) corticosteroids has been widely advocated for the treatment of chronic… 

Figures from this paper

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Clarithromycin and endoscopic sinus surgery for adults with chronic rhinosinusitis with and without nasal polyps: study protocol for the MACRO randomised controlled trial

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Contemporary Use of Corticosteroids in Rhinology

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Different types of intranasal steroids for chronic rhinosinusitis.

Low quality evidence was found relating to disease severity and nasal polyps size, with results from the high-dose and low-dose groups being similar and the primary adverse effect, epistaxis, was more common when higher doses were used.

Short-course oral steroids as an adjunct therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis.

A short course of oral corticosteroids as an adjunct ('add-on') therapy in people with chronic rhinosinusitis who are already on standard treatments and there was a greater improvement in symptom severity 30 days after the start of treatment in patients who received oral steroids and antibiotics.

Systemic and topical antibiotics for chronic rhinosinusitis.

The primary outcomes were disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQL), patient-reported disease severity and the commonest adverse event - gastrointestinal disturbance and it is very uncertain if antibiotics were associated with an increase in gastrointestinal disturbances.

Saline irrigation for chronic rhinosinusitis.

The effects of saline irrigation in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis was evaluated and the evidence was assessed to be of low quality for the three months follow-up and very lowquality for the six months following-up.

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