Intranasal Corticosteroids and Adrenal Suppression

@article{Bruni2009IntranasalCA,
  title={Intranasal Corticosteroids and Adrenal Suppression},
  author={Francesca M. Bruni and Giuseppina De Luca and V. Venturoli and Attilio Loris Boner},
  journal={Neuroimmunomodulation},
  year={2009},
  volume={16},
  pages={353 - 362}
}
Allergic rhinitis is a common condition that frequently coexists with asthma and atopic dermatitis. It is commonly treated with intranasal corticosteroids which may increase the potential inception of side effects of the same type of drugs used for the treatment of other allergic diseases. A method to assess the systemic effect of corticosteroids is the evaluation of their effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, it is not clear which test is best for detection of… 
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