Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rodents to study the neurobiology of motivation

@article{Carlezon2007IntracranialS,
  title={Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rodents to study the neurobiology of motivation},
  author={William A Carlezon and Elena H. Chartoff},
  journal={Nature Protocols},
  year={2007},
  volume={2},
  pages={2987-2995}
}
It has become increasingly important to assess mood states in laboratory animals. Tests that reflect reward, reduced ability to experience reward (anhedonia) and aversion (dysphoria) are in high demand because many psychiatric conditions that are currently intractable in humans (e.g., major depression, bipolar disorder, addiction) are characterized by dysregulated motivation. Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) can be utilized in rodents (rats, mice) to understand how pharmacological or… CONTINUE READING

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