Intracoronary autologous bone-marrow cell transfer after myocardial infarction: the BOOST randomised controlled clinical trial

@article{Wollert2004IntracoronaryAB,
  title={Intracoronary autologous bone-marrow cell transfer after myocardial infarction: the BOOST randomised controlled clinical trial},
  author={K. Wollert and G. Meyer and J. Lotz and Stefanie Ringes Lichtenberg and P. Lippolt and C. Breidenbach and S. Fichtner and T. Korte and B. Hornig and D. Messinger and L. Arseniev and B. Hertenstein and A. Ganser and H. Drexler},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2004},
  volume={364},
  pages={141-148}
}
BACKGROUND Emerging evidence suggests that stem cells and progenitor cells derived from bone marrow can be used to improve cardiac function in patients after acute myocardial infarction. In this randomised trial, we aimed to assess whether intracoronary transfer of autologous bone-marrow cells could improve global left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) at 6 months' follow-up. METHODS After successful percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial… Expand
Intracoronary bone marrow cell transfer after myocardial infarction: 5-year follow-up from the randomized-controlled BOOST trial.
TLDR
A single intracoronary application of BMCs does not promote a sustained improvement of LVEF in STEMI patients with relatively preserved systolic function, and it is conceivable that a subgroup of patients with more transmural infarcts may derive a sustained benefit from BMC therapy. Expand
Intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow cells and left ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction: a meta-analysis
TLDR
Considering the increase in LVEF during follow‐up, transplantation of BMC may be a safe and beneficial procedure to support treatment of AMI and further efforts aiming at large‐scale, double‐blind, randomized and placebo‐controlled multi‐center trials in conjunction with better definition of patients, which benefit from BMC infusion, appear to be warranted. Expand
Intracoronary injection of mononuclear bone marrow cells in acute myocardial infarction.
TLDR
A randomized, controlled trial found no effects of intracoronary injection of autologous mononuclear BMC on global left ventricular function. Expand
Intracoronary Bone Marrow Cell Transfer After Myocardial Infarction: Eighteen Months’ Follow-Up Data From the Randomized, Controlled BOOST (BOne marrOw transfer to enhance ST-elevation infarct regeneration) Trial
TLDR
In this study, a single dose of intracoronary BMCs did not provide long-term benefit on LV systolic function after AMI compared with a randomized control group; however, the study suggests an acceleration of LV ejection fraction recovery after AMi by BMC therapy. Expand
Bone-marrow-derived cell transfer after ST-elevation myocardial infarction: lessons from the BOOST trial
TLDR
It is indicated that intracoronary transfer of autologous BMCs is a safe, promising, and novel approach to further improving systolic function in patients with successful reperfusion after acute myocardial infarction. Expand
Intracoronary bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in acute myocardial infarction.
TLDR
Intracoronary administration of BMC is associated with improved recovery of left ventricular contractile function in patients with acute myocardial infarction and large-scale studies are warranted to examine the potential effects of progenitor-cell administration on morbidity and mortality. Expand
Intracoronary autologous bone marrow cell transfer after myocardial infarction: the BOOST-2 randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial
TLDR
The BOOST-2 trial does not support the use of nucleated BMCs in patients with STEMI and moderately reduced LVEF treated according to current standards of early PCI and drug therapy. Expand
Autologous intracoronary mononuclear bone marrow cell transplantation in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy in humans.
TLDR
In this pilot trial intracoronary transplantation of autologous, mononuclear BMC did not lead to any significant improvement in myocardial function and physical performance of patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. Expand
Intracoronary autologous mononucleated bone marrow cell infusion for acute myocardial infarction: results of the randomized multicenter BONAMI trial.
TLDR
Intracoronary autologous BMC administration to patients with decreased LVEF after AMI was associated with improvement of myocardial viability in multivariate-but not in univariate-analysis, and a large multicentre international trial is warranted. Expand
Impact of intracoronary bone marrow cell transfer on diastolic function in patients after acute myocardial infarction: results from the BOOST trial.
TLDR
Intracoronary autologous BMC transfer improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function in patients after AMI. Expand
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