Intra-sexual Dimorphism in Male Mandibles and Male Aggressive Behavior in the Broad-Horned Flour Beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

Abstract

In the stored-product beetle, the broad-horned flour beetle, Gnatocerus cornutus (Fabricius), all males possess enlarged mandibles, widened gena, and a pair of small horns on the vertex, but females lack these completely. Observations of male-male interactions of G. cornutus showed that larger individuals won male-male fights, and that the mandibles were used as weapons. Morphological analysis based on the non-linearity test of Eberhard and Gutierrez's model (1991) showed that intra-sexual dimorphism in males was only found in the mandibles used in male-male combat, but not in the gena and horns. This beetle can be an ideal model for evolutionary studies of exaggerated weapons for male combat, because rearing successive generations and observing male fighting are easy.

DOI: 10.1007/s10905-006-9038-z

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Cite this paper

@article{Okada2006IntrasexualDI, title={Intra-sexual Dimorphism in Male Mandibles and Male Aggressive Behavior in the Broad-Horned Flour Beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)}, author={Kensuke Okada and Akihiro Miyanoshita and Takahisa Miyatake}, journal={Journal of Insect Behavior}, year={2006}, volume={19}, pages={457-467} }