Intestinal innate immune cells in gut homeostasis and immunosurveillance.

@article{Tomasello2013IntestinalII,
  title={Intestinal innate immune cells in gut homeostasis and immunosurveillance.},
  author={Elena Tomasello and Sammy Bedoui},
  journal={Immunology and cell biology},
  year={2013},
  volume={91 3},
  pages={
          201-3
        }
}
The intestinal tract is the largest internal extension of the body’s surface and as such is constantly exposed to a myriad of environmental stimuli that include, but are not limited to microbes, dietary products and diverse inorganic materials.1 The intestine is therefore challenged with the daunting task of segregating the underlying tissues from potentially noxious determinants of the environment. A single layer of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) provides a distinct anatomical barrier in… CONTINUE READING

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The intestinal tract is the largest internal extension of the body ’s surface and as such is constantly exposed to a myriad of environmental stimuli that include , but are not limited to microbes , dietary products and diverse inorganic materials.1 The intestine is therefore challenged with the daunting task of segregating the underlying tissues from potentially noxious determinants of the environment .
This plasticity is likely also related to ILC heterogeneity , as discussed by Philip and Artis.7 This heterogeneity becomes clearly apparent when comparing ILCs isolated from different tissues , or from distinct species , emphasizing the importance of a precise characterization of the different stages of ILC differentiation and their putative degree of multipotency .
This plasticity is likely also related to ILC heterogeneity , as discussed by Philip and Artis.7 This heterogeneity becomes clearly apparent when comparing ILCs isolated from different tissues , or from distinct species , emphasizing the importance of a precise characterization of the different stages of ILC differentiation and their putative degree of multipotency .
This plasticity is likely also related to ILC heterogeneity , as discussed by Philip and Artis.7 This heterogeneity becomes clearly apparent when comparing ILCs isolated from different tissues , or from distinct species , emphasizing the importance of a precise characterization of the different stages of ILC differentiation and their putative degree of multipotency .
The intestinal tract is the largest internal extension of the body ’s surface and as such is constantly exposed to a myriad of environmental stimuli that include , but are not limited to microbes , dietary products and diverse inorganic materials.1 The intestine is therefore challenged with the daunting task of segregating the underlying tissues from potentially noxious determinants of the environment .
Intestinal Wall TissueAnatomic structure is physical part ofIntestines
The intestinal tract is the largest internal extension of the body ’s surface and as such is constantly exposed to a myriad of environmental stimuli that include , but are not limited to microbes , dietary products and diverse inorganic materials.1 The intestine is therefore challenged with the daunting task of segregating the underlying tissues from potentially noxious determinants of the environment .
The intestinal tract is the largest internal extension of the body ’s surface and as such is constantly exposed to a myriad of environmental stimuli that include , but are not limited to microbes , dietary products and diverse inorganic materials.1 The intestine is therefore challenged with the daunting task of segregating the underlying tissues from potentially noxious determinants of the environment .
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