Interviewing Witnesses: The Effect of Forced Confabulation on Event Memory

@article{Pezdek2007InterviewingWT,
  title={Interviewing Witnesses: The Effect of Forced Confabulation on Event Memory},
  author={Kathy Pezdek and Kathryn Sperry and Shana M Owens},
  journal={Law and Human Behavior},
  year={2007},
  volume={31},
  pages={463-478}
}
After viewing a crime video, participants answered 16 answerable and 6 unanswerable questions. Those in the “voluntary guess” condition had a “don’t know” response option; those in the “forced guess” condition did not. One week later the same questions were answered with a “don’t know” option. In both experiments, information generated from forced confabulation was less likely remembered than information voluntarily self-generated. Further, when the same answer was given to an unanswerable… Expand

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