Interspecific competition between the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren and ghost ant, Tapinoma melanocephalum Fabricius for honeydew resources produced by an invasive mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsiley

@article{Zhou2014InterspecificCB,
  title={Interspecific competition between the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren and ghost ant, Tapinoma melanocephalum Fabricius for honeydew resources produced by an invasive mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsiley},
  author={Aiming Zhou and Guang-wen Liang and Yong-yue Lu and L. W. Zeng and Yijuan Xu},
  journal={Arthropod-Plant Interactions},
  year={2014},
  volume={8},
  pages={469-474}
}
In natural as in agricultural ecosystems, interactions between ants and honeydew-producing hemipterans are commonly observed. Mutualisms between invasive ants and hemipterans have been extensively studied in recent years. However, native ant species can equally exploit the honeydew excreted by hemipterans, and establish close relationships with them. Up till present, little is known about the competition between exotic ants (such as Solenopsis invicta) and its co-occurring species (e.g… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Interference Competition for Mutualism between Ant Species Mediates Ant-Mealybug Associations
TLDR
It is concluded that interference competition for mutualism between ant species can mediate ant-mealybug associations and the fitness of mealybug colony. Expand
Impact of the red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren on biodiversity in South China: A review
Abstract The red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is a problematic invasive species in China since at least 2003. Over the past 15 years, a numerous studies were published on the impacts ofExpand
Invasion biology of the cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley: Current knowledge and future directions
TLDR
It is speculated that specific biological factors associated with this mealybug, particularly its wide host range, high reproductive potential, evolved changes in life history traits, and mutualism with ants have played important roles in its invasions, allowing this pest to become established and rapidly increase its population upon its introduction into new regions. Expand
Interference competition and predation between invasive and native herbivores in maize
TLDR
This work shows how the invasive S. frugiperda exhibits a clear competitive advantage over native lepidopterans and could replace certain species within local agroecosystems and may also guide subsequent monitoring and management interventions. Expand
Food Preferences and Foraging Activity of Asian Weaver Ants, Oecophylla smaragdina (Fabricius) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
TLDR
How the weaver ants respond to different types of foods and indirectly, forming a strategic foraging activity to maximise their food supplies for their colony is exhibited. Expand
Symbiotic microbiota may reflect host adaptation by resident to invasive ant species
TLDR
The hypothesis that bacterial symbiont communities can help hosts by buffering behavioral changes caused by interspecies competition as a consequence of biological invasions is supported. Expand
Prevalence and management of Solenopsis invicta in China
TLDR
The two-step method of combing toxic baits and contact dust emerges as the forefront method crucial in managing S. invicta, thereby causing negative impacts on the abundance, diversity, and richness of native arthropod communities. Expand
Red Imported Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta Buren
Since it was found in Taiwan and mainland, the spread of red imported fire ant Solenopsis invicta Buren into China has been continuous. In order to achieve better control of this pest, science andExpand
Ant–hemipteran association decreases parasitism of Phenacoccus solenopsis by endoparasitoid Aenasius bambawalei
TLDR
A small number of studies have explored how ant tending helps defend against natural enemies in honeydew‐excreting hemipterans, and this work is the first to address this issue in detail. Expand
Changes in the photosynthetic characteristics of cotton leaves infested by invasive mealybugs tended by native ant species
TLDR
It is suggested that the tending ants may enhance the feeding ability of individual mealy bugs in spite of the decreased number of mealybugs in this situation. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
Interference competition between the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta Buren) and two native ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
TLDR
The results indicated that the aggressive intensity of S.invicta was stronger than the two native ants, and the aggressiveness between S. Invicta and T.fervida was strongerthan that between S and P.frelida, suggesting that the aggression between those two ants are more intensive. Expand
Does Mutualism Drive the Invasion of Two Alien Species? The Case of Solenopsis invicta and Phenacoccus solenopsis
TLDR
Results suggest that the conditional mutualism between S. invicta and P. solenopsis facilitates population growth and fitness of both species, and may facilitate the invasion success of bothspecies. Expand
Invasive Argentine ants reduce fitness of red maple via a mutualism with an endemic coccid
TLDR
Investigating the effects of a mutualism between the invasive Argentine ant and the endemic terrapin scale on coccid density and the fitness of the host of this mutualism, the endemic red maple, found that red maples with Argentine ants excluded from their canopy had higher seed mass and larger early leaves indicating that this invasive ant-endemic scale mutualism imposed a net fitness cost to the host tree. Expand
Introduced fire ants can exclude native ants from critical mutualist-provided resources
TLDR
The results provide the first experimental evidence that introduced ants compete for access to mutualist-provided carbohydrates with native ants and that these carbohydrates represent critical resources for both introduced and native ants. Expand
Widespread association of the invasive ant Solenopsis invicta with an invasive mealybug
TLDR
The honeydew produced in Homoptera shelters at study sites in east Texas could supply nearly one-half of the daily energetic requirements of an S. invicta colony, suggesting that Exploitative or mutually beneficial associations that occur between these insects may be an important, previously unrecognized factor promoting their success. Expand
Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), Defend Phenacoccus solenopsis (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) Against Its Natural Enemies
TLDR
Testing the hypothesis that ant tending can increase the densities of the mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), and reduce the density of theMealybug's predatory and parasitic enemies, the lady beetle, Menochilus sexmaculata Fabricius, and the parasitoid wasp showed thatAnt tending significantly increased the survival of mealybugs. Expand
Mechanisms of interspecific competition among an invasive and two native fire ants
The mechanisms of interspecific competition among an invasive and two native Solenopsis fire ant forms were investigated in a series of laboratory experiments. In separate trials each with aExpand
Host plant and ants influence the honeydew sugar composition of aphids
TLDR
Honeydew composition is an important factor in mediating ant–homopteran mutualisms and the trisaccharide melezitose is especially significant in this interaction, but it is shown for the first time that ant tending may itself influence honeyd Dew composition. Expand
Intercontinental differences in resource use reveal the importance of mutualisms in fire ant invasions
TLDR
The potential for mutualistic interactions to play a fundamental role in the establishment and spread of animal invasions is illustrated, as laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that honeydew elevated colony growth, a crucial determinant of competitive performance, even when insect prey were not limiting. Expand
Disruption of Cotton Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)—Natural Enemy Dynamics by Red Imported Fire Ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
TLDR
Red imported fire ants enhance cotton aphid survival and density in the field through predator interference, and with the addition of fire ants to aphid-predator treatments, Aphid survival approximately doubled. Expand
...
1
2
3
...