Interspecific Interactions Between Cebus capucinus and Other Species: Data from Three Costa Rican Sites

@article{Rose2004InterspecificIB,
  title={Interspecific Interactions Between Cebus capucinus and Other Species: Data from Three Costa Rican Sites},
  author={Lisa M. Rose and Susan Emily Perry and Melissa A. Panger and Katharine M. Jack and Joseph H. Manson and Julie Gros-Louis and Katherine C MacKinnon and Erin R. Vogel},
  journal={International Journal of Primatology},
  year={2004},
  volume={24},
  pages={759-796}
}
Capuchins exhibit considerable cross-site variation in domains such as foraging strategy, vocal communication and social interaction. We report interactions between white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus) and other species. We present comparative data for 11 groups from 3 sites in Costa Rica that are ecologically similar and geographically close, thus reducing the likelihood that differences are due solely to genetic or ecological differences. Our aim is to document both the range of variation… 

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