Interspecies hormonal interactions between man and the domestic dog (Canis familiaris)

@article{Jones2006InterspeciesHI,
  title={Interspecies hormonal interactions between man and the domestic dog (Canis familiaris)},
  author={Amanda Claire Jones and Robert A Josephs},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2006},
  volume={50},
  pages={393-400}
}
To date, hormonal influence in interspecies interaction has not been examined. [...] Key Result In a study of a dog agility competition among human/dog teams, men's pre-competition basal testosterone (T) levels were positively related to changes in dogs' cortisol levels from pre- to post-competition, but only among losing teams. Furthermore, pre-competition basal T in men on losing teams predicted more than half of the variance in dogs' cortisol change.Expand
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The hypothesis that testosterone's effect on competitive performance depends on whether competition is among individuals (individual competition) or among teams (intergroup competition), which is consistent with the hypothesis that high testosterone individuals are motivated to gain status (good performance in individual competition), whereas low testosterone individuals is motivated to cooperate with others ( good performance in intergroup competition).
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