Intersectional inclusion for deaf learners: moving beyond General Comment no. 4 on Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

@article{Murray2018IntersectionalIF,
  title={Intersectional inclusion for deaf learners: moving beyond General Comment no. 4 on Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities},
  author={Joseph J. Murray and Kristin Snoddon and Maartje De Meulder and Kathryn Underwood},
  journal={International Journal of Inclusive Education},
  year={2018},
  volume={24},
  pages={691 - 705}
}
ABSTRACT This paper discusses the meaning of inclusive education for deaf learners in a way that acknowledges the diversity of learner identities, and outlines problems with normative definitions of inclusive education as advanced by recent interpretations of Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). This discussion calls on us to reconsider how the concepts of inclusion and segregation are understood in education for all learners with… 

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