Interpreting the fossil evidence for the evolutionary origins of music

@inproceedings{Wurz2010InterpretingTF,
  title={Interpreting the fossil evidence for the evolutionary origins of music},
  author={Sarah Wurz},
  year={2010}
}
The adaptive history of two components of music, rhythmic entrained movement and complex learned vocalization, is examined. The development of habitual bipedal locomotion around 1.6 million years ago made running possible and coincided with distinct changes in the vestibular canal dimensions. The vestibular system of the inner ear clearly plays a role in determining rhythm and therefore bipedalism did not only make refined dancing movements possible, but also changed rhythmic capabilities. In… CONTINUE READING

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