Interpretation of health news items reported with or without spin: protocol for a prospective meta-analysis of 16 randomised controlled trials

@article{Haneef2017InterpretationOH,
  title={Interpretation of health news items reported with or without spin: protocol for a prospective meta-analysis of 16 randomised controlled trials},
  author={Romana Haneef and Am{\'e}lie Yavchitz and Philippe Ravaud and Gabriel Baron and Ivan Oranksy and Gary Schwitzer and Isabelle Boutron},
  journal={BMJ Open},
  year={2017},
  volume={7}
}
Introduction We aim to compare the interpretation of health news items reported with or without spin. ‘Spin’ is defined as a misrepresentation of study results, regardless of motive (intentionally or unintentionally) that overemphasises the beneficial effects of the intervention and overstates safety compared with that shown by the results. Methods and analysis We have planned a series of 16 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to perform a prospective meta-analysis. We will select a sample of… 

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