Interpersonal Emotion Regulation: Implications for Affiliation, Perceived Support, Relationships, and Well-Being

@article{Williams2018InterpersonalER,
  title={Interpersonal Emotion Regulation: Implications for Affiliation, Perceived Support, Relationships, and Well-Being},
  author={W. Craig Williams and Sylvia A. Morelli and Desmond C. Ong and Jamil Zaki},
  journal={Journal of Personality and Social Psychology},
  year={2018},
  volume={115},
  pages={224–254}
}
People often recruit social resources to manage their emotions, a phenomenon known as interpersonal emotion regulation (IER). Despite its importance, IER’s psychological structure remains poorly understood. We propose that two key dimensions describe IER: (a) individuals’ tendency to pursue IER in response to emotional events, and (b) the efficacy with which they perceive IER improves their emotional lives. To probe these dimensions, we developed the Interpersonal Regulation Questionnaire (IRQ… 
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