Internet use and depression among retired older adults in the United States: a longitudinal analysis.

@article{Cotten2014InternetUA,
  title={Internet use and depression among retired older adults in the United States: a longitudinal analysis.},
  author={Shelia R. Cotten and George S. Ford and Sherry Ford and Timothy M. Hale},
  journal={The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={69 5},
  pages={
          763-71
        }
}
  • S. Cotten, George S. Ford, +1 author T. Hale
  • Published 2014
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
OBJECTIVES The purpose of this study is to examine the association between Internet use among retired older adults in the United States and changes in a commonly used predictor of depression (the CES-D). METHOD Analyzing data from four waves (2002-2008) of the Health and Retirement Survey, we assess whether an available and commonly used index of a depression state was affected by prior values of the index and Internet use. The sample includes 3,075 respondents observed over 4 waves of data… Expand
Exploring the Relationship Between Internet Use and Mental Health Among Older Adults in England: Longitudinal Observational Study
TLDR
Investigation of the longitudinal relationship between two distinct concepts of mental health with the frequency of internet use among older adults finds policies to improve mental health in older adults should encourage internet use, especially as a tool to aid communication. Expand
Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Purposes of Internet Use and Well-being Among Older Adults
TLDR
Test the indirect impact of online engagement for social, informational, and instrumental purposes on older adults' well-being via reducing loneliness and supporting social engagement to inform the focus of interventions which aim to promoteWell-being. Expand
Internet Use and Loneliness of Older Adults Over Time: the mediating effect of social contact.
  • K. Yu, Shinyi Wu, I. Chi
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2020
TLDR
Findings imply that internet use may be an effective tool for reducing loneliness in older people by maintaining social contact by examining the mediating effect of social contact. Expand
Internet Use and Cognitive Functioning in Late Adulthood: Longitudinal Findings from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).
  • S. Kamin, F. R. Lang
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2018
TLDR
Findings indicate that using the Internet positively affects cognitive functioning in late life, and sheds light on the direction of association between cognitive functioning and Internet use. Expand
What Accounts for the Relationship Between Internet Use and Suicidal Ideation of Korean Older Adults? A Mediation Analysis
  • H. Jun, Myoung-Yong Kim
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2017
TLDR
The results suggest that the Internet is an important social and health activity that contributes to lowering suicidal ideation in older adults and support previous theories about the relationship between social relationships, depression, and suicidal behavior. Expand
Internet Use and Depressive Symptoms Among Chinese Older Adults: The Mediation and Suppression Effects of Social Capital
  • Zhiyi Li, Mengyao Yang
  • Medicine
  • Frontiers in Psychology
  • 2021
TLDR
The ordinary least square (OLS) regression results showed that both Internet use characteristics and social capital components were protective factors for the prevention of depressive symptoms among older adults. Expand
Can Online Communication Prevent Depression Among Older People? A Longitudinal Analysis.
TLDR
The findings support the role of online communication with friends/family in preventing clinical depression among older people and could be particularly useful in the COVID-19 crisis because many families are geographically dispersed and/or socially distanced. Expand
The association between Internet use and health-related outcomes in older adults and the elderly: a cross-sectional study
  • M. Duplaga
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
  • 2021
TLDR
Internet use is not associated with favourable patterns of lifestyle or higher self-rated health in older Polish adults, however, persons with chronic conditions or disabilities who make use of the Internet are less likely to utilise health services. Expand
Internet use and self-rated health among Swedish 70-year-olds: a cross-sectional study
TLDR
Although the direction of the relationship between more frequent Internet use and better self-rated health is undetermined, it can be suggested that using the Internet informs and educates older adults, strengthening their position as active and engaged participants of society. Expand
Young at heart and online? Subjective age and internet use in two Swiss survey studies
ABSTRACT Subjective age (SA) indicates how old a person feels. SA has been found to be a marker of an individual’s physical and psychological functioning and openness for new aging experiences. Thus,Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 73 REFERENCES
Internet use and depression among older adults
TLDR
All empirical methods indicate a positive contribution of Internet use to mental well-being of retired older adults (>=50years), reducing depression categorization by approximately 20-28%. Expand
Impact of Internet Use on Loneliness and Contact with Others Among Older Adults: Cross-Sectional Analysis
TLDR
Using the Internet may be beneficial for decreasing loneliness and increasing social contact among older adults in assisted and independent living communities. Expand
Internet Use and Social Networking Among Middle Aged and Older Adults
In this study, the associations between Internet use and the social networks of adults over 50 years of age were examined. A sample (n = 2284) from the 2004 wave of the Health and Retirement SurveyExpand
Computer and Internet Interventions for Loneliness and Depression in Older Adults: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
It is suggested that computer and Internet programs were effective in managing loneliness among older adults, and further computer-mediated social support should be considered to help manage loneliness in this population. Expand
Loneliness as a specific risk factor for depressive symptoms: cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses.
TLDR
It is suggested that loneliness and depressive symptomatology can act in a synergistic effect to diminish well-being in middle-aged and older adults. Expand
Internet Use and Psychological Well-being: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
This meta-analysis examines the relationship between various Internet uses and measures of psychological well-being, including depression, loneliness, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, and found a small detrimental effect of Internet use on psychologicalWell-being. Expand
The persistence of depressive symptoms in older workers who experience involuntary job loss: results from the health and retirement survey.
  • W. Gallo, E. Bradley, +4 authors S. Kasl
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The journals of gerontology. Series B, Psychological sciences and social sciences
  • 2006
TLDR
The findings identify older workers with limited wealth as an important group for which the potential effect of involuntary job separation in the years preceding retirement is ongoing (enduring) adverse mental health. Expand
Elevated depressive symptoms among caregiving grandparents.
TLDR
Grandparents have a greater probability of elevated depressive symptoms when a grandchild is in their home, versus when agrandchild is not in theirHome. Expand
Impact of husbands' involuntary job loss on wives' mental health, among older adults.
TLDR
The effect of husbands' job loss on wives' mental health appears to be magnified when wives report being financially satisfied pre-job loss, which suggests that, for subgroups of older couples, mental health services specifically targeted at displaced men should also be made available to wives. Expand
Can the Internet Improve the Well-being of the Elderly?
In this paper we report on a project that aimed to evaluate the potential of the Internet to reduce social isolation amongst the elderly, and thereby, improve psychosocial functioning. TwentyExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...