International Collaboration on Childhood Leukemia

@article{Pui2003InternationalCO,
  title={International Collaboration on Childhood Leukemia},
  author={Ching-Hon Pui and Raul C. Ribeiro},
  journal={International Journal of Hematology},
  year={2003},
  volume={78},
  pages={383-389}
}
The current cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has reached 80% in many industrialized countries, but in developing countries the rate is often less than 10%.To advance the cure rate, investigators have formed several parallel initiatives in both industrialized and developing countries through international collaboration and partnership. Among industrialized countries, investigators have combined data to conduct in-depth studies of the biology and heterogeneity of high-risk or… Expand
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