Interhemispheric Binding of Ambiguous Visual Motion Is Associated with Changes in Beta Oscillatory Activity but Not with Gamma Range Synchrony

@article{Costa2017InterhemisphericBO,
  title={Interhemispheric Binding of Ambiguous Visual Motion Is Associated with Changes in Beta Oscillatory Activity but Not with Gamma Range Synchrony},
  author={G. Costa and J. V. Duarte and Ricardo Martins and M. Wibral and M. Castelo-Branco},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2017},
  volume={29},
  pages={1829-1844}
}
  • G. Costa, J. V. Duarte, +2 authors M. Castelo-Branco
  • Published 2017
  • Psychology, Computer Science, Medicine
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
  • In vision, perceptual features are processed in several regions distributed across the brain. Yet, the brain achieves a coherent perception of visual scenes and objects through integration of these features, which are encoded in spatially segregated brain areas. How the brain seamlessly achieves this accurate integration is currently unknown and is referred to as the “binding problem.” Among the proposed mechanisms meant to resolve the binding problem, the binding-by-synchrony hypothesis… CONTINUE READING
    3 Citations

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