Intergenerational continuity of child physical abuse: how good is the evidence?

@article{Ertem2000IntergenerationalCO,
  title={Intergenerational continuity of child physical abuse: how good is the evidence?},
  author={Ilgi Ertem and John M. Leventhal and Sara Dobbs},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2000},
  volume={356},
  pages={814-819}
}
BACKGROUND There is widespread belief that individuals who were physically abused during childhood are more likely to abuse their own children than those who were not abused, but the empirical studies examining this belief have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of this study was to evaluate systematically, based on eight methodological standards derived from a hypothetical randomised controlled trial, the design of studies investigating the intergenerational transmission of child… Expand
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