Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Great Britain and the United States since 1850

@article{Long2013IntergenerationalOM,
  title={Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Great Britain and the United States since 1850},
  author={Jason T. Long and Joseph P. Ferrie},
  journal={The American Economic Review},
  year={2013},
  volume={103},
  pages={1109-1137}
}
We reanalyze Long and Ferrie's data. We find that the association of occupational status across generations was quite similar over time and place. Two significant differences were: (i) American farms in 1880 were far more open to men who had nonfarm backgrounds than were American farms in 1973 or British farms in either century; (ii) of the four cases, the intergenerational correlation was strongest in Britain in 1881. Structural mobility related to, among other things, economic growth and… 

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Using historical census and survey data, Long and Ferrie (2013) found a significant decline in social mobility in the United States from 1880 to 1973. We present two critiques of the Long-Ferrie

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Intergenerational occupational mobility in GreatBritain and the United States Since 1850: Comment

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