Interdisciplinary Differential Diagnosis and Care of a Patient with Atypical Delusional Parasitosis due to early HIV-related Dementia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To provide a differential diagnosis and recommendations for care for an individual with suspected delusional parasitosis secondary to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHOD A 62-year-old male with sexually acquired, chronic, and well-managed HIV infection was referred for neuropsychological evaluation and treatment recommendations following extensive self-manipulation of a sternoclavicular cystic mass and superficial skin lesions over most of his body. The patient reported that he had pulled long calcified tendrils out of the mass over a period of several weeks and that "encapsulated fat" was flowing beneath his skin. RESULTS Numerous lab panels were negative for any acute medical pathology. Clinical neuroimaging was unremarkable. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed a profile consistent with mild neurocognitive disorder due to HIV. Medical and behavioral recommendations were made for the management of delusional thought processes consistent with atypical delusional parasitosis and other symptoms. The patient was responsive to carefully crafted provider feedback and his delusional and somatic symptoms decreased significantly with risperidone. CONCLUSIONS This case illustrates the utility of neuropsychological assessment and provider feedback in the diagnosis and care of HIV-related neurocognitive disorder, the context of a delusional disorder.

DOI: 10.1080/13854046.2015.1042921

Cite this paper

@article{Medaglia2015InterdisciplinaryDD, title={Interdisciplinary Differential Diagnosis and Care of a Patient with Atypical Delusional Parasitosis due to early HIV-related Dementia.}, author={John D. Medaglia and Kathryn K Vankirk and Cameron B Oswald and Lewis Church}, journal={The Clinical neuropsychologist}, year={2015}, volume={29 4}, pages={559-69} }