Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Phenomenology of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations

@article{Woods2014InterdisciplinaryAT,
  title={Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Phenomenology of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations},
  author={Angela Woods and Nev Jones and Marco Bernini and Felicity Callard and Ben Alderson-Day and Johanna C. Badcock and Vaughan Bell and Chris C. H. Cook and Thomas J Csordas and Clara S. Humpston and Joel Krueger and Frank Lar{\o}i and Simon McCarthy-Jones and Peter Moseley and Hilary Powell and Andrea Raballo and David Smailes and Charles Fernyhough},
  journal={Schizophrenia Bulletin},
  year={2014},
  volume={40},
  pages={S246 - S254}
}
Despite the recent proliferation of scientific, clinical, and narrative accounts of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs), the phenomenology of voice hearing remains opaque and undertheorized. In this article, we outline an interdisciplinary approach to understanding hallucinatory experiences which seeks to demonstrate the value of the humanities and social sciences to advancing knowledge in clinical research and practice. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to the phenomenology of AVH… 
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  • 2016
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It is argued that previous self-monitoring theories struggle to account for both the differences and similarities in the characteristic features of AVH and TI, which can be readily accommodated within an APS framework.
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The findings highlight significant personification of AVH even at first clinical presentation, and personified voices appear to be distinguished less by their intrinsic properties, commanding qualities, or connection with trauma than by their affordances for conversation and companionship.
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This commentary responds to Shapiro, Bussing, and Nguyen’s (2014) case study of "Kate," a 16-year-old adolescent female who required psychiatric hospitalization for auditory hallucinations with
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ABRM may contribute to the development of neurocognitive models of hallucinations by making hallucination experiences more visible, tangible, and accessible.
Culture and Hallucinations: Overview and Future Directions
TLDR
It is argued that the extant body of work suggests that culture does indeed have a significant impact on the experience, understanding, and labeling of hallucinations and that there may be important theoretical and clinical consequences of that observation.
Better Than Mermaids and Stray Dogs? Subtyping Auditory Verbal Hallucinations and Its Implications for Research and Practice
TLDR
This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer’s own interpretations, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.
Interdisciplinarity as cognitive integration: auditory verbal hallucinations as a case study
  • M. Bernini, A. Woods
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Wiley interdisciplinary reviews. Cognitive science
  • 2014
TLDR
A new model for disciplinary integration is proposed which brings to the fore an under-investigated dynamic of interdisciplinary projects, namely their being processes of distributed cognition and cognitive integration.
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This article explores how AVH subtypes may be identified at the levels of phenomenology, cognition, neurology, etiology, treatment response, diagnosis, and voice hearer’s own interpretations, including the need for a subtype assessment tool.
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