Interactive technologies for autism

@article{Kientz2013InteractiveTF,
  title={Interactive technologies for autism},
  author={Julie A. Kientz and Matthew S. Goodwin and Gillian R. Hayes and Gregory D. Abowd},
  journal={CHI '07 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2013}
}
In meeting health, education, and lifestyle goals, technology can both assist individuals with autism, and support those who live and work with them, such as family, caregivers, coworkers, and friends. The uniqueness of each individual with autism and the context of their lives provide interesting design challenges for the successful creation and adoption of technologies for this domain. This Special Interest Group (SIG) aims to bring together those who study the use of technology by and for… 
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