Interactions between pollinator and non‐pollinator fig wasps: correlations between their numbers can be misleading

@article{Raja2015InteractionsBP,
  title={Interactions between pollinator and non‐pollinator fig wasps: correlations between their numbers can be misleading},
  author={Shazia Raja and Nazia Suleman and Rupert J Quinnell and Stephen G. Compton},
  journal={Entomological Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={18}
}
Ficus and their species–specific pollinator fig wasps represent an obligate plant–insect mutualism, but figs also support a community of non‐pollinating fig wasps (NPFWs) that consist of phytophages and parasitoids or inquilines. We studied interactions between Kradibia tentacularis, the pollinator of a dioecious fig tree species Ficus montana, and an undescribed NPFW Sycoscapter sp. Members of Sycoscapter sp. oviposited 2–4 weeks after pollinator oviposition, when host larvae were present in… 
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