Interactions between oil-collecting bees and Krameria grandiflora (Krameriaceae) with emphasis on the role of specialized floral traits in the mutual fit

@article{Carneiro2019InteractionsBO,
  title={Interactions between oil-collecting bees and Krameria grandiflora (Krameriaceae) with emphasis on the role of specialized floral traits in the mutual fit},
  author={Liedson Tavares Carneiro and Camila B{\'a}rbara Danny Silva Andr{\'e} and Adriana Takahasi and Isabel Alves-dos-Santos},
  journal={Arthropod-Plant Interactions},
  year={2019},
  volume={13},
  pages={213-226}
}
Oil-producing flowers have evolved specialized traits along with the ability to secrete oil as reward, leading to the expectation of a narrow relationship between floral architecture and oil-collecting behaviours of pollinators. Krameriaceae flowers have a showy calyx and a less conspicuous dimorphic corolla modified into a pair of elaiophores that secrete the oil, and a group of petaloid petals that, among oil-collecting bees, are used by only Centris (Centridini) during the oil gathering. A… 
Pollinator Community Predicts Trait Matching between Oil-Producing Flowers and a Guild of Oil-Collecting Bees
TLDR
Reduced trait matching associated with increased community diversity for individual pollinator species but close matching at the community level supports the importance of community context for shaping interacting traits of flowers and pollinators.
Relicthemisia, a new subgenus of the oil-collecting bee genus Centris Fabricius, 1804 with notes on distribution and host plants of C. xanthomelaena Moure & Castro, 2001 (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
TLDR
It is proposed to recognize this species as the single member of the monotypic Relicthemisia, a new subgenus which belongs to the ‘Centris group’, one of the main internal lineages of the genus.
Ten years of ‘APIS’ impact: 10 years in communication and advance toward understanding complex arthropod-plant interactions
  • D. Voigt
  • Environmental Science
    Arthropod-Plant Interactions
  • 2019
TLDR
The diversity of APIS contents and complex backgrounds is reflected in the contributions to this APIS 10-Year Jubilee special issue, and methodology, assays, experiments, scenarios, reviews, and critical forum papers are considered as well.
Biological notes on Centris (Trachina) perforator with a comparative analysis of the species with ground-nesting habits of the genus (Apidae: Centridini)
TLDR
Information is presented for the first time on nesting site, the architecture of nests, sex ration, and development of Centris (Trachina) perforator, which is protandric with adults emerging between 48‒83 days.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 65 REFERENCES
Clinal variability of oil and nectar rewards in Monttea aphylla (Plantaginaceae): relationships with pollinators and climatic factors in the Monte Desert
TLDR
It is suggested that large-scale variation in rewards involves local optima throughout the species range, related to processes that operate in each ecoregion with their particular biotic and abiotic scenarios.
Pollination of four sympatric species ofAngelonia (Scrophulariaceae) by oil-collecting bees in NE. Brazil
The manner whereby the oil-producing bisaccate flowers ofAngelonia (Scrophulariaceae) are pollinated by female oil-collecting bees is reported for the first time. Observations were made in the
ECOLOGY, BEHAVIOR AND BIONOMICS A Polinização de Krameria bahiana B.B. Simpson (Krameriaceae) por Abelhas (Apidae) na Restinga, BA
TLDR
This study focused on the analysis of interactions between the flowers of K. bahiana and their visiting bees, aiming for the efficiency of the pollination, in an area of the Coastal Sand Plains of Bahia State, Brazil.
[The pollination of Krameria bahiana B.B. Simpson by bees in the Coastal Sand Plains of Bahia, Brazil].
TLDR
This study focused on the analysis of interactions between the flowers of K. bahiana and their visiting bees, aiming for the efficiency of the pollination, in an area of the Coastal Sand Plains of Bahia State, Brazil.
The ecology of oil flowers and their bees
TLDR
A new area of research in pollination ecology arose in 1969 when Stefan Vogel described a hitherto unrecognized "floral syndrome" when plants in many genera of five families were confirmed as having highly specialized oil-secreting organs.
The evolution and loss of oil-offering flowers: new insights from dated phylogenies for angiosperms and bees
  • S. Renner, H. Schaefer
  • Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
Using recent phylogenies, new data on oil-offering Cucurbitaceae, and molecular-dating, it is shown that oil flowers evolved at least 28 times and that floral oil was lost at least 36–40 times in the cause of evolution.
Floral Rewards: Alternatives to Pollen and Nectar
TLDR
The occurrence of oil production in the Solanaceae (Nierembergia) is reported here for the first time and it is apparent that oil production has evolved independently many times, but plants which produce oils that are collected by female anthophorine bees show similarities in the chemistry of the oils and the types of structures that produce them.
Floral Conservatism in Neotropical Malpighiaceae
TLDR
The purpose of this paper is to consider southwestern United States to temperate Argentina, why the flowers of this family have remained so conservative in spite of the evolution of great diversity in other aspects of the phenotype.
...
...