Interaction of the TaqIA polymorphism and poor parental socialization on changes in adolescent marijuana use.

Abstract

The current study uses data from the genetic subsample from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) in waves I and II (ages of 11-19 and 12-20 respectively) to investigate the interaction of the TaqIA polymorphism and poor parental socialization on changes in adolescent marijuana use. Results reveal that TaqIA interacts with poor parental rule setting, but not quality of mother-child communication, to influence changes in marijuana use. Adolescents who are homozygous for the A1 and whose parents allow the youth to set their own curfew experience significant increases in marijuana use during adolescence. In contrast, youths with the A1/A1 genotype whose parents do not allow the adolescent to set their own curfew experience significant decreases in the frequency of marijuana use. These results suggest that direct parental social control may effectively suppress the genetic risk of the A1/A1 genotype on marijuana use in adolescence. The study's limitations are noted.

DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2012.754898

Cite this paper

@article{Vaske2013InteractionOT, title={Interaction of the TaqIA polymorphism and poor parental socialization on changes in adolescent marijuana use.}, author={Jamie C Vaske}, journal={Substance use & misuse}, year={2013}, volume={48 3}, pages={258-64} }