Interaction Between Functional Genetic Variation of DRD2 and Cannabis Use on Risk of Psychosis.

@article{Colizzi2015InteractionBF,
  title={Interaction Between Functional Genetic Variation of DRD2 and Cannabis Use on Risk of Psychosis.},
  author={Marco Colizzi and Conrad Osamede Iyegbe and John Powell and Gianluca Ursini and Annamaria Porcelli and Aurora Bonvino and Paolo Taurisano and Raffaella Romano and Rita Masellis and Giuseppe Blasi and Craig Morgan and Katherine J. Aitchison and Valeria Mondelli and Sonija Luzi and Anna Kolliakou and Anthony S. David and Robin M. Murray and Alessandro Bertolino and Marta di Forti},
  journal={Schizophrenia bulletin},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 5},
  pages={
          1171-82
        }
}
Both cannabis use and the dopamine receptor (DRD2) gene have been associated with schizophrenia, psychosis-like experiences, and cognition. However, there are no published data investigating whether genetically determined variation in DRD2 dopaminergic signaling might play a role in individual susceptibility to cannabis-associated psychosis. We genotyped (1) a case-control study of 272 patients with their first episode of psychosis and 234 controls, and also from (2) a sample of 252 healthy… 
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