Inter-theory relations in quantum gravity: Correspondence, reduction, and emergence

@article{Crowther2018IntertheoryRI,
  title={Inter-theory relations in quantum gravity: Correspondence, reduction, and emergence},
  author={Karen Crowther},
  journal={Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics},
  year={2018}
}
  • Karen Crowther
  • Published 1 December 2017
  • Philosophy
  • Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics
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