Inter-annual variation in the breeding chronology of arctic shorebirds: effects of weather, snow melt and predators.

@article{Smith2010InterannualVI,
  title={Inter-annual variation in the breeding chronology of arctic shorebirds: effects of weather, snow melt and predators.},
  author={Paul A. Smith and H. Grant Gilchrist and Mark R. Forbes and Jean-Louis Martin and Karel A. Allard},
  journal={Journal of Avian Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={41},
  pages={292-304}
}
Arctic breeding shorebirds travel thousands of kilometres between their wintering and breeding grounds, yet the period over which they arrive and begin to initiate nests spans only several weeks. We investigated the role of local conditions such as weather, snow cover and predator abundance on the timing of arrival and breeding for shorebirds at four sites in the eastern Canadian arctic. Over 11 years, we monitored the arrival of 12 species and found 821 nests. Weather was highly variable over… 

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