Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the radiographic diagnosis and treatment of acromioclavicular joint separations.

@article{Kraeutler2012InterAI,
  title={Inter- and intraobserver reliability of the radiographic diagnosis and treatment of acromioclavicular joint separations.},
  author={M. J. Kraeutler and Gerald R. Williams and Steven B Cohen and M. Ciccotti and Bradford S Tucker and J. Dines and D. Altchek and Christopher C. Dodson},
  journal={Orthopedics},
  year={2012},
  volume={35 10},
  pages={
          e1483-7
        }
}
The management of acromioclavicular joint separations, in particular Rockwood types III and V, remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the observer reliability of shoulder surgeons when presented with the same cases of acromioclavicular joint separations. The authors retrospectively identified 28 patients who were diagnosed with a type III, IV, or V acromioclavicular joint separation. A PowerPoint presentation was compiled that contained an anteroposterior and axial… Expand
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