Intentional Ignorance: A History of Blind Assessment and Placebo Controls in Medicine

@article{Kaptchuk1998IntentionalIA,
  title={Intentional Ignorance: A History of Blind Assessment and Placebo Controls in Medicine},
  author={Ted J. Kaptchuk},
  journal={Bulletin of the History of Medicine},
  year={1998},
  volume={72},
  pages={389 - 433}
}
  • T. Kaptchuk
  • Published 1 September 1998
  • Medicine
  • Bulletin of the History of Medicine
La methodologie de la recherche medicale moderne est fondee sur une evaluation en aveugle au cours de laquelle les patients ignorent s'ils sont traites par un placebo ou par un traitement medicamenteux, particulierement en pharmacologie et en psychologie 
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