Intensity of Aphasia Therapy: Evidence and Efficacy

@article{Cherney2011IntensityOA,
  title={Intensity of Aphasia Therapy: Evidence and Efficacy},
  author={Leora R. Cherney and Janet P. Patterson and Anastasia M. Raymer},
  journal={Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports},
  year={2011},
  volume={11},
  pages={560-569}
}
Determining the optimal amount and intensity of treatment is essential to the design and implementation of any treatment program for aphasia. A growing body of evidence, both behavioral and biological, suggests that intensive therapy positively impacts outcomes. We update a systematic review of treatment studies that directly compares conditions of higher and lower intensity treatment for aphasia. We identify five studies published since 2006, review them for methodologic quality, and… Expand
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A growing body of literature has investigated the efficacy of computer-based treatments for people with aphasia. In this narrative review, we describe a representative sample of 12 studies that wereExpand
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TLDR
Aphasia LIFT was successful in meeting the overarching goal of ICAPs, to maximise communication and enhance life participation in individuals with aphasia, and in many cases the treatment effect was enduring. Expand
Treatment Response to a Double Administration of Constraint-Induced Language Therapy in Chronic Aphasia.
TLDR
Changes in oral-verbal expressive language associated with improvements following 2 treatment periods of constraint-induced language therapy in 4 participants with stroke-induced chronic aphasia are investigated, confirming that significant language gains continue well past the point of spontaneous recovery and can occur in a relatively short time period. Expand
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