Integrating the active process of hair cells with cochlear function

@article{Hudspeth2014IntegratingTA,
  title={Integrating the active process of hair cells with cochlear function},
  author={A. J. Hudspeth},
  journal={Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year={2014},
  volume={15},
  pages={600-614}
}
  • A. Hudspeth
  • Published 2014
  • Physics, Medicine
  • Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Uniquely among human senses, hearing is not simply a passive response to stimulation. Our auditory system is instead enhanced by an active process in cochlear hair cells that amplifies acoustic signals several hundred-fold, sharpens frequency selectivity and broadens the ear's dynamic range. Active motility of the mechanoreceptive hair bundles underlies the active process in amphibians and some reptiles; in mammals, this mechanism operates in conjunction with prestin-based somatic motility… Expand

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