Integrating methods for determining length-at-age to improve growth estimates for two large scombrids

Abstract

Growth is perhaps the most studied of all parameters used to describe the life history of exploited fish. Growth is usually expressed as a mathematical equation describing the mean growth of a population and relating size to age (Katsanevakis and Maravelias, 2008). An understanding of growth is fundamental for population modeling, stock assessments, and managing exploited species (Gulland, 1988). The methods used to estimate growth in fish vary significantly with the type of data being used. The most commonly used data for estimating fish growth is length-at-age data, although length-frequency data and mark recapture data are also used (Francis, 1988; Labelle et al., 1993). Counts of periodic growth increments observed in otoliths or other hard parts are predominantly used to estimate fish age (Begg et al., 2005; Campana, 2005), and a range of growth models have been developed to be fitted to length-at-age data (e.g., Ricker, 1979; Schnute, 1981). However, length-atIntegrating methods for determining length-at-age to improve growth estimates for two large scombrids

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Ballagh2010IntegratingMF, title={Integrating methods for determining length-at-age to improve growth estimates for two large scombrids}, author={Aaron C. Ballagh and David J. Welch and Ashley J. Williams and Amos J. Mapleston and Andrew J. Tobin and Nicholas Marton}, year={2010} }