Integrating common and rare genetic variation in diverse human populations

@article{Altshuler2010IntegratingCA,
  title={Integrating common and rare genetic variation in diverse human populations},
  author={David M Altshuler and Richard A. Gibbs and Leena Peltonen and Emmanouil T. Dermitzakis and Stephen F. Schaffner and Fuli Yu and Penelope E. Bonnen and Paul I. W. de Bakker and Panos Deloukas and S. Gabriel and Rhian Gwilliam and Sarah E. Hunt and Michael Inouye and Xiaoming Jia and Aarno Palotie and Melissa Parkin and Pamela Whittaker and Kyle Chang and Alicia C. Hawes and Lora R. Lewis and Yanru Ren and David A. Wheeler and Donna M. Muzny and Chris P. Barnes and Katayoon Darvishi and Matthew E. Hurles and Joshua M. Korn and Kati Kristiansson and Charles Lee and Steven A McCarrol and James Nemesh and Alon Keinan and Stephen B. Montgomery and Samuela J. Pollack and Alkes L. Price and Nicole Soranzo and Claudia Gonzaga‐Jauregui and Verneri Anttila and Wendy Brodeur and Mark J. Daly and Stephen Leslie and Gil McVean and Loukas Moutsianas and Huy Nguyen and Qingrun Zhang and Mohammed J. R. Ghori and Ralph McGinnis and William M. McLaren and Fumihiko Takeuchi and Sharon R. Grossman and Ilya Shlyakhter and Elizabeth Hostetter and Pardis C Sabeti and Clement A Adebamowo and Morris W. Foster and Deborah R. Gordon and Julio Licinio and Marianna Manca and Patricia A. Marshall and Ichiro Matsuda and Duncan Ngare and Vivian Ota Wang and Deepa S. Reddy and Charles N. Rotimi and Charmaine D. M. Royal and Richard R. Sharp and Changqing Zeng and Lisa D. Brooks and Jean E Mcewen},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={467},
  pages={52-58}
}
Despite great progress in identifying genetic variants that influence human disease, most inherited risk remains unexplained. A more complete understanding requires genome-wide studies that fully examine less common alleles in populations with a wide range of ancestry. To inform the design and interpretation of such studies, we genotyped 1.6 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,184 reference individuals from 11 global populations, and sequenced ten 100-kilobase regions in… 

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