Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa

@article{Reeder2015IntegratedAR,
  title={Integrated Analyses Resolve Conflicts over Squamate Reptile Phylogeny and Reveal Unexpected Placements for Fossil Taxa},
  author={Tod W. Reeder and Ted M. Townsend and Daniel G. Mulcahy and Brice P. Noonan and Perry L. Wood and Jack W. Sites and John J. Wiens},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2015},
  volume={10}
}
Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a pivotal group whose relationships have become increasingly controversial. Squamates include >9000 species, making them the second largest group of terrestrial vertebrates. They are important medicinally and as model systems for ecological and evolutionary research. However, studies of squamate biology are hindered by uncertainty over their relationships, and some consider squamate phylogeny unresolved, given recent conflicts between molecular and… 

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