Integer circuit evaluation is PSPACE-complete

@article{Yang2000IntegerCE,
  title={Integer circuit evaluation is PSPACE-complete},
  author={Ke Yang},
  journal={Proceedings 15th Annual IEEE Conference on Computational Complexity},
  year={2000},
  pages={204-211}
}
  • Ke Yang
  • Published 4 July 2000
  • Mathematics
  • Proceedings 15th Annual IEEE Conference on Computational Complexity
In this paper, we address the problem of evaluating the integer circuit (IC), or the {U,/spl times/,+}-circuit over the set of natural numbers. The problem is a natural extension to the integer expression by L.J. Stockmeyer and A.R. Mayer (1973); and is also studied by P. Mckenzie et al. (1999) in their "Polynomial Replacement System". We show a polynomial-time algorithm that reduces QBP (quantified Boolean formula) problem to the integer circuit problem. This complements the result of K.W… 

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