Intake of vitamin E, vitamin C, and carotenoids and the risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis

@article{Etminan2005IntakeOV,
  title={Intake of vitamin E, vitamin C, and carotenoids and the risk of Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis},
  author={M. Etminan and S. Gill and A. Samii},
  journal={The Lancet Neurology},
  year={2005},
  volume={4},
  pages={362-365}
}
We studied the effect of vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta carotene intake on the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies published between 1966 and March 2005 searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. Eight studies were identified (six case-control, one cohort, and one cross-sectional). We found that dietary intake of vitamin E protects against PD. This protective influence was seen with both moderate intake (relative risk… Expand
Effect of dietary vitamins C and E on the risk of Parkinson's disease: A meta-analysis.
TLDR
It is concluded that vitamin E might have a protective effect against PD, while vitamin C does not seem to have such an effect, and the exact mechanism of the transport and regulation of vitamin E in the CNS remains elusive. Expand
Vitamin A and Carotenoids and the Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
TLDR
Assessment of the epidemiological evidence on the association between blood levels or dietary intakes of vitamin A and carotenoids and risk of Parkinson's disease concludes that data published to date are insufficient for drawing definite conclusions. Expand
Dietary intake of iron, zinc, copper, and risk of Parkinson’s disease: a meta-analysis
TLDR
Higher iron intake appears to be not associated with overall PD risk, but may be associated with risk of PD in western population, and sex may be a factor influencing PD risk for higher iron intake. Expand
Dietary iron intake and risk of Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
Although the authors' prospective data did not support an association between total iron intake (dietary and supplemental) and risk of Parkinson's disease, a 30% increased risk was associated with a diet rich in nonheme iron, present in those who had low vitamin C intake. Expand
Dietary Antioxidants and the Risk of Parkinson Disease
TLDR
This study provides Class III evidence that dietary vitamin E and C intake are inversely associated with the risk of PD. Expand
Dietary fat and antioxidant vitamin intake in patients of neurodegenerative disease in a rural region of Jalisco, Mexico
TLDR
Patients with possible Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease had a lower intake of fruits and vegetables, which could be due to type of food to which they have access, and the C vitamin intake in patients was still higher than the recommended. Expand
A systematic review of nutritional risk factors of Parkinson's disease
TLDR
The majority of studies did not find significant associations between nutritional factors and PD, and coffee drinking and alcohol intake were the only exposures with a relatively large number of studies, and meta-analyses of each supported inverse associations with PD. Expand
Antioxidants, Supplements, and Parkinson's Disease
TLDR
Antioxident supplementation, in particular tocopherol, did not appear to alter the course of PD, and antioxidants and supplements appear to have a limited role in the prevention or treatment of PD. Expand
Vitamin E and Alzheimer’s disease: what do we know so far?
TLDR
Despite a strong rationale in support of a beneficial role for vitamin E for the treatment of AD, the evidence remains inconclusive and the clinical safety of vitamin E remains controversial and warrants further investigation. Expand
Diet Quality and Risk of Parkinson's Disease: A Prospective Study and Meta-Analysis.
TLDR
Having high diet quality or a healthy dietary pattern was associated with lower future risk of Parkinson's disease. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 25 REFERENCES
Intakes of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, vitamin supplements, and PD risk
TLDR
The reduction in risk of PD associated with high dietary vitamin E intake suggests that other constituents of foods rich in vitamin E may be protective, but this benefit may be lost with higher intakes. Expand
Dietary antioxidants and other dietary factors in the etiology of Parkinson's disease
TLDR
This study does not provide support for a protective effect of long‐term dietary antioxidant intake on PD risk, and trends toward greater PD risk were associated with higher intakes of vitamin C and carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, reflecting higher intakes by PD cases of fruit and certain vegetables. Expand
Dietary vitamin E and Parkinson's disease: something to chew on
  • C. Olanow
  • Medicine, Chemistry
  • The Lancet Neurology
  • 2003
TLDR
Findings suggest that the SNc is in a state of oxidative stress: indeed, post mortem studies provide evidence of oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA in the substantia nigra of patients with PD. Expand
Dietary antioxidants and Parkinson disease. The Rotterdam Study.
TLDR
The data suggest that a high intake of dietary vitamin E may protect against the occurrence of PD. Expand
Adult nutrient intake as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
An association of PD is suggested with high intake of total fat, saturated fats, cholesterol, lutein and iron, among people aged > or =50 years in metropolitan Detroit. Expand
Diet and Parkinson's disease II
TLDR
The results suggest that if antioxidants play a protective role in this disease, the amounts provided by diet alone are insufficient, and an inverse association between beta-carotene and ascorbic acid intake is found. Expand
Case‐control study of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and dietary vitamin E intake
TLDR
Though consistent with prior reports of PD protection afforded by legumes, and with speculation on the possible benefits of dietary or supplemental vitamin E in preventing PD, these preliminary data do not conclusively document a beneficial effect of dietary vitamin E on PD occurrence. Expand
Risk Factors for Parkinson’s Disease: The Leisure World Cohort Study
TLDR
Several environmental factors that may be related to the development of Parkinson’s disease are suggested and support a multifactorial etiology. Expand
Effects of tocopherol and deprenyl on the progression of disability in early Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
Deprenyl but not tocopherol delays the onset of disability associated with early, otherwise untreated Parkinson's disease and the action of deprenyl that accounts for its beneficial effects remains unclear. Expand
On-off effects in Parkinson's disease: a controlled investigation of ascorbic acid therapy.
TLDR
Ascorbic acid therapy reduced plasma concentrations of levodopa and 3-O-methyldopa but did not alter erythrocyte COMT activity, which is discussed in the context of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors that contribute to the pathogenesis oflevodopa-induced dyskinesias and on-off motor fluctuations. Expand
...
1
2
3
...