Intake of the major carotenoids and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies

@article{Koushik2006IntakeOT,
  title={Intake of the major carotenoids and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in a pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies},
  author={Anita Koushik and David J. Hunter and Donna Spiegelman and Kristin E. Anderson and Julie E. Buring and Jo L. Freudenheim and R. Alexandra Goldbohm and Susan E Hankinson and Susanna C. Larsson and Michael F. Leitzmann and James Marshall and Marjorie L McCullough and Anthony B Miller and Carmen Rodr{\'i}guez and Thomas E Rohan and Julie A. Ross and Arthur Schatzkin and Leo J. Schouten and Walter C. Willett and Alicja Wolk and Shumin M. Zhang and Stephanie A Smith-Warner},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2006},
  volume={119}
}
Carotenoids, found in fruits and vegetables, have the potential to protect against cancer because of their properties, including their functions as precursors to vitamin A and as antioxidants. We examined the associations between intakes of α‐carotene, β‐carotene, β‐cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin and lycopene and the risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. The primary data from 10 prospective cohort studies in North America and Europe were analyzed and then pooled. Carotenoid intakes were… 
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Phytochemicals and cancer risk: a review of the epidemiological evidence.
  • P. Miller, D. Snyder
  • Medicine
    Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
  • 2012
TLDR
Although elevated risk of certain cancers with higher levels of certain phytochemicals was observed, an insufficient pool of studies examining the same associations or inconsistent findings across studies limit the ability to conclude that any one phytochemical increases cancer risk.
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