• Corpus ID: 13855067

Intake of carrots, spinach, and supplements containing vitamin A in relation to risk of breast cancer.

@article{Longnecker1997IntakeOC,
  title={Intake of carrots, spinach, and supplements containing vitamin A in relation to risk of breast cancer.},
  author={Matthew P. Longnecker and Polly A. Newcomb and Robert Mittendorf and E. Robert Greenberg and Walter C. Willett},
  journal={Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers \& prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology},
  year={1997},
  volume={6 11},
  pages={
          887-92
        }
}
  • M. Longnecker, P. Newcomb, W. Willett
  • Published 1 November 1997
  • Medicine
  • Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
Intake of fruits, vegetables, vitamin A, and related compounds are associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer in some studies, but additional data are needed. To estimate intake of beta-carotene and vitamin A, the authors included nine questions on food and supplement use in a population-based case-control study of breast cancer risk conducted in Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Wisconsin in 1988-1991. Multivariate-adjusted models were fit to data for 3543 cases and 9406 controls… 

Tables from this paper

Intake of food groups and associated micronutrients in relation to risk of early‐stage breast cancer
TLDR
Intakes of cereals and grains, vegetables and beans are associated with minimal, if any, reduction in risk of early‐stage breast cancer among young women, and risk was not associated with dietary constituents related to these food groups.
Fruits, vegetables, soy foods and breast cancer in pre- and postmenopausal Korean women: a case-control study.
  • M. Do, Sang Sun Lee, J. Y. Kim, P. Jung, M. H. Lee
  • Medicine
    International journal for vitamin and nutrition research. Internationale Zeitschrift fur Vitamin- und Ernahrungsforschung. Journal international de vitaminologie et de nutrition
  • 2007
TLDR
It is suggested that high intake of some fruits, vegetables, and soybeans may be associated with a reduced breast cancer risk.
Carotenoids, antioxidants and ovarian cancer risk in pre‐ and postmenopausal women
TLDR
Intake of alpha‐carotene from food and supplements and intake of lycopene was significantly and inversely associated with risk for ovarian cancer, predominantly in premenopausal women, and consumption of fruits, vegetables and food items high in carotene and Lycopene may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer.
Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of breast cancer: a pooled analysis of cohort studies.
TLDR
The results suggest that fruit and vegetable consumption during adulthood is not significantly associated with reduced breast cancer risk.
Contribution Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer in the Black Women ’ s Health Study
TLDR
Study findings suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables is inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptornegative breast cancer, and that specific vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer overall.
Fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study.
TLDR
Study findings suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables is inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor- negative/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer, and that specific vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer overall.
Association between dietary carrot intake and breast cancer
TLDR
The overall current literatures suggested that dietary carrot intake was associated with decreased risk of breast cancer.
A population-based case–control study of carotenoid and vitamin A intake and ovarian cancer (United States)
TLDR
Results support previous findings suggesting an inverse relationship between carotenoid intake and ovarian cancer risk, and observe non-significantly lower risks with high consumption of spinach, carrots, skim/lowfat milk and liver.
Original Contribution Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer in the Black Women’s Health Study
TLDR
Study findings suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables is inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptornegative breast cancer, and that specific vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer overall.
Retinol, vitamins A, C, and E and breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression
TLDR
The results indicate that both the total intake of vitamin A and retinol could reduce breast cancer risk, and associations between other vitamins and breast cancer seem to be limited.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 41 REFERENCES
Intake of vitamins A, C, and E and postmenopausal breast cancer. The Iowa Women's Health Study.
TLDR
The association between dietary antioxidant vitamin intake and the risk of breast cancer was examined in a prospective study of 34,387 postmenopausal women in Iowa, and results provide little evidence that intake of these vitamins is associated with breast cancer risk.
A prospective study of the intake of vitamins C, E, and A and the risk of breast cancer.
TLDR
Large intakes of vitamin C or E did not protect women in this study from breast cancer; any benefit of vitamin A supplements may be limited to women with diets low in vitamin A.
Vitamins C and E, retinol, beta-carotene and dietary fibre in relation to breast cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.
TLDR
The findings do not suggest a strong role, if any, for intake of vitamins C and E, beta-carotene, retinol, dietary fibre, vegetables, fruit and potatoes in the aetiology of breast cancer.
Premenopausal breast cancer risk and intake of vegetables, fruits, and related nutrients.
TLDR
In this population, intake of vegetables appears to decrease premenopausal breast cancer risk, and this effect may be related to beta-carotene and lutein + zeaxanthin in vegetables.
Consumption of olive oil and specific food groups in relation to breast cancer risk in Greece.
TLDR
Vegetable consumption and fruit consumption were independently associated with statistically significant reductions of breast cancer risk by 12% and 8%, respectively, per quintile increase; no significant associations were evident for the other food groups examined.
The effect of vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of lung cancer and other cancers in male smokers.
TLDR
No reduction in the incidence of lung cancer among male smokers is found after five to eight years of dietary supplementation with alpha-tocopherol or beta carotene, and this trial raises the possibility that these supplements may actually have harmful as well as beneficial effects.
Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: a review of the epidemiological evidence.
TLDR
It would appear that major public health benefits could be achieved by substantially increasing consumption of fruit and vegetable consumption, and in particular in cancers of the esophagus, oral cavity, and larynx, for which 28 of 29 studies were significant.
Vegetables, fruit, and cancer prevention: a review.
Dietary intake of fat, fiber and other nutrients is related to the use of vitamin and mineral supplements in the United States: the 1992 National Health Interview Survey.
TLDR
Diet, demographic and lifestyle characteristics of supplement users are typical of patterns associated with low risk of chronic disease, and diets of vitamin supplement users were lower in fat and higher in fiber and vitamins A and C for both men and women.
Relation of vegetable, fruit, and grain consumption to colorectal adenomatous polyps.
TLDR
Findings support the hypothesis that high intake of vegetables, fruits, or grains decreases the risk of polyps and suggest that any protective effects might reflect unmeasured constituents in these foods.
...
...