Intake of calorically sweetened beverages and obesity

@article{Olsen2009IntakeOC,
  title={Intake of calorically sweetened beverages and obesity},
  author={N. Olsen and B. Heitmann},
  journal={Obesity Reviews},
  year={2009},
  volume={10}
}
The prevalence of obesity has increased in the past 30 years, and at the same time a steep increase in consumption of soft drinks has been seen. This paper reviews the literature for studies on associations between intake of calorically sweetened beverages and obesity, relative to adjustment for energy intake. Conclusions from previous reviews have been inconsistent, but some included many cross‐sectional studies or studies supported by sugar industry. A literature search was performed for… Expand
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