Intake of Added Sugars and Selected Nutrients in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003—2006

@article{Marriott2010IntakeOA,
  title={Intake of Added Sugars and Selected Nutrients in the United States, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003—2006},
  author={Bernadette P Marriott and Lauren E. W. Olsho and Louise S Hadden and Patty Connor},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition},
  year={2010},
  volume={50},
  pages={228 - 258}
}
In the Institute of Medicine (IOM) macronutrient report the Committee recommended a maximal intake of ≤ 25% of energy from added sugars. The primary objectives of this study were to utilize National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to update the reference table data on intake of added sugars from the IOM report and compute food sources of added sugars. We combined data from NHANES with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) MyPyramid Equivalents Database (MPED) and… 
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