Intact intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) representations of rostral and caudal forelimb areas in rats with quinolinic acid lesions of the medial or lateral caudate-putamen in an animal model of Huntington's disease.

Abstract

Neurotoxic, cell-specific lesions of the rat caudate-putamen (CPu) have been proposed as a model of human Huntington's disease and as such impair performance on many motor tasks, including skilled forelimbs tasks such as reaching for food. Because the CPu and motor cortex share reciprocal connections, it has been proposed that the motor deficits are due in part to a secondary disruption of motor cortex. The purpose of the present study was to examine the functionality of the motor cortex using intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) following neurotoxic lesions of the CPu. ICMS maps have been shown to be sensitive indicators of motor skill, cortical injury, learning, and experience. Long-evans hooded rats received a sham, a medial, or a lateral CPu lesion using the neurotoxin, quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid). Two weeks later the motor cortex was stimulated under light ketamine anesthesia. Neither lateral nor medial lesions of the CPu altered the stimulation threshold for eliciting forelimb movements, the type of movements elicited, or the size of the rostral forelimb (RFA) and caudal forelimb areas (CFA) from which movements were elicited. The preservation of ICMS forelimb movement representations (the forelimb map) in rats with cell-specific CPu lesions suggests motor impairments following lesions of the lateral striatum are not due to the disruption of the motor map. Therefore, the impairments that follow striatal cell loss are due either to alterations in circuitry that is independent of motor cortex or to alterations in circuitry afferent to the motor cortex projections.

DOI: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2008.04.012

Cite this paper

@article{Karl2008IntactIM, title={Intact intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) representations of rostral and caudal forelimb areas in rats with quinolinic acid lesions of the medial or lateral caudate-putamen in an animal model of Huntington's disease.}, author={Jenni M. Karl and Lori-Ann R. Sacrey and Robert J. McDonald and Ian Q. Whishaw}, journal={Brain research bulletin}, year={2008}, volume={77 1}, pages={42-8} }