Intact Priming for Novel Perceptual Representations in Amnesia

@article{Hamann1997IntactPF,
  title={Intact Priming for Novel Perceptual Representations in Amnesia},
  author={Stephan Hamann and Larry R. Squire},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={1997},
  volume={9},
  pages={699-713}
}
  • S. Hamann, L. Squire
  • Published 1 November 1997
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Recent studies have challenged the notion that priming for ostensibly novel stimuli such as pseudowords (REAB) reflects the creation of new representations. Priming for such stimuli could instead reflect the activation of familiar memory representations that are orthographically similar (READ) and/or the activation of subparts of stimuli (RE, EX, AR), which are familar because they occur commonly in English. We addressed this issue in three experiments that assessed perceptual identification… 
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