Corpus ID: 35573053

Institutional and community-based long-term care: a comparative estimate of public costs.

@article{Kitchener2006InstitutionalAC,
  title={Institutional and community-based long-term care: a comparative estimate of public costs.},
  author={Martin James Kitchener and Terence Ng and Nancy A. Miller and Charlene Harrington},
  journal={Journal of health \& social policy},
  year={2006},
  volume={22 2},
  pages={
          31-50
        }
}
As long-term care policy makers struggle with competing challenges including state budget deficits and pressures to expand homeand community-based services (HCBS), there is a pressing need for information on the comparative cost of Medicaid HCBS and institutional care. This paper uses the most recent available data (2002) to present three per participant expenditure comparisons between Medicaid HCBS waivers (which require that participants have an institutional level of care need) and… Expand

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