• Corpus ID: 6736829

Institutional Repository Position statement part two : maintaining immune health

@inproceedings{Walsh2016InstitutionalRP,
  title={Institutional Repository Position statement part two : maintaining immune health},
  author={Neil P. Walsh and Michael Gleeson and David B. Pyne and David C. Nieman and Firdaus S Dhabhar and Roy J Shephard and Samuel J. Oliver and St{\'e}phane Bermon and Alma Kajeniene},
  year={2016}
}
The physical training undertaken by athletes is one of a set of lifestyle or behav-ioural factors that can influence immune function, health and ultimately exercise performance. Others factors including potential exposure to pathogens, health status, lifestyle behaviours, sleep and recovery, nutrition and psychosocial issues, need to be considered alongside the physical demands of an athlete's training programme. The general consensus on managing training to maintain immune health is to start… 

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References

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