Insights into the western Bantu dispersal: mtDNA lineage analysis in Angola

@article{Plaza2004InsightsIT,
  title={Insights into the western Bantu dispersal: mtDNA lineage analysis in Angola},
  author={St{\'e}phanie Plaza and Antonio Salas and Francesc Calafell and Francisco C{\^o}rte-Real and Jaume Bertranpetit and {\'A}ngel Carracedo and David Comas},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={115},
  pages={439-447}
}
Africa is the homeland of humankind and it is known to harbour the highest levels of human genetic diversity. However, many continental regions, especially in the sub-Saharan side, still remain largely uncharacterized (i.e. southwest and central Africa). Here, we examine the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a sample from Angola. The two mtDNA hypervariable segments as well as the 9-bp tandem repeat on the COII/tRNAlys intergenic region have allowed us to allocate mtDNAs to common African… Expand
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