Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird

@article{Zhou2008InsightID,
  title={Insight into diversity, body size and morphological evolution from the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird},
  author={Zhonghe Zhou and Julia A. Clarke and Fucheng Zhang},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2008},
  volume={212}
}
Most of Mesozoic bird diversity comprises species that are part of one of two major lineages, namely Ornithurae, including living birds, and Enantiornithes, a major radiation traditionally referred to as ‘opposite birds’. Here we report the largest Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird from north‐east China, which provides evidence that basal members of Enantiornithes share more morphologies with ornithurine birds than previously recognized. Morphological evolution in these two groups has been… 
A new small enantiornithine bird from the Jehol Biota, with implications for early evolution of avian skull morphology
TLDR
The results indicate that the quadratojugal is an inverted L-shaped element, morphologically similar to that of more basal birds Archaeopteryx bavarica, Jeholornis prima, Confuciusornis sanctus and Sapeornis chaoyangensis, contributing to the refinement of the cranial kinesis in early birds.
An Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird with a pintail
TLDR
A new Early Cretaceous enantiornithine is reported, Yuanchuavis kompsosoura gen. sp.
Novel evolution of a hyper-elongated tongue in a Cretaceous enantiornithine from China and the evolution of the hyolingual apparatus and feeding in birds.
TLDR
The fossil of a new enantiornithine bird from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation in Liaoning Province, northeastern China preserves a few important skeletal features previously unknown among early stem and extant birds, including an extremely elongate bony hyoid element (only slightly shorter than the skull), combined with a short cranial rostrum.
A Large Bird from the Early Cretaceous of China: New Information on the Skull of Enantiornithines
TLDR
The histological characterization of CNUVB-0903 indicates that it was not yet a full-grown individual at the time of death, and supports previous evidence indicating that early in their history, enantiornithines were able to achieve relatively large sizes.
A New Ornithuromorph (Aves: Ornithothoraces) Bird from the Jehol Group Indicative of Higher-Level Diversity
TLDR
The discovery of a new bird from the Lower Cretaceous Yixian Formation, Liaoning Province, China, which represents a new species, but bears similarities to Hongshanornis longicresta from the same formation of Inner Mongolia, and represents a clade of specialized ‘shorebirds’ whose elongate hindlimbs indicate ecological adaptations different from those of other Jehol ornithuromorphs.
A bizarre Early Cretaceous enantiornithine bird with unique crural feathers and an ornithuromorph plough-shaped pygostyle
Enantiornithes are the most successful clade of Mesozoic birds. Here, we describe a new enantiornithine bird, Cruralispennia multidonta gen. et sp. nov., from the Protopteryx-horizon of the Early
A revision of enantiornithine (Aves: Ornithothoraces) skull morphology
TLDR
A comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of enantiornithine skull anatomy is presented and a number of trophic specializations can be deduced from the range of preserved morphologies, further hinting at the morphological and ecological diversity of the Cretaceous Enantiornithes.
A new basal ornithuromorph bird (Aves: Ornithothoraces) from the Early Cretaceous of China with implication for morphology of early Ornithuromorpha
TLDR
A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis resolved the new taxon in a basal position that is only more derived than Archaeorhynchus and Jianchangornis among ornithuromorphs, increasing the morphological diversity of basal ornithuomorphs.
A new ornithurine from the Early Cretaceous of China sheds light on the evolution of early ecological and cranial diversity in birds
TLDR
It is found that, consistent with a proposed developmental shift in cranial ontogeny late in avialan evolution, this elongate rostrum in Changzuiornis ahgmi is achieved through elongation of the maxilla while the premaxilla remains only a small part of rostral length.
The fossil record and limb disparity of enantiornithines, the dominant flying birds of the Cretaceous
TLDR
Comparisons of fossil record dynamics show that enantiornithine ‘collectorship’ since the 1980s approaches an exponential distribution, indicating that an asymptote in proportion of specimens has yet to be achieved, and demonstrate that the fossil record of enantiORNithines is complete enough for the extraction of biological patterns.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 261 REFERENCES
Insight into the evolution of avian flight from a new clade of Early Cretaceous ornithurines from China and the morphology of Yixianornis grabaui
TLDR
The complete articulated holotype specimen of Yixianornis grabaui, from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation of Liaoning Province, in north‐eastern China, arguably the best‐preserved basal ornithurine specimen yet discovered, provides the earliest evidence consistent with the presence of extant avian tail feather fanning.
Cretaceous avian remains from Patagonia shed new light on the early radiation of birds
The anatomy of a new articulated enantiornithine bird skeleton from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia clearly indicates a capacity for powered flight, approaching that of modern birds.
The origin and early diversification of birds
Numerical cladistic analysis of 73 cranial and postcranial characters has resulted in a highly corroborated hypothesis describing the phylogenetic pattern of early avian evolution. Using “non-avian
Discovery of an ornithurine bird and its implication for Early Cretaceous avian radiation.
  • Zhonghe Zhou, Fucheng Zhang
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2005
An ornithurine bird, Hongshanornis longicresta gen. et sp. nov., represented by a nearly complete and articulated skeleton in full plumage, has been recovered from the lacustrine deposits of the
Early diversification of birds: Evidence from a new opposite bird
TLDR
The new bird represents a new ecological type different from all known members of Enantiornithes, and shows that enantiornithines had probably originated earlier than the Early Cretaceous, or this group had experienced a rapid radiation right after it first occurred in the early EarlyCretaceous.
A New Carinate Bird from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina)
TLDR
A new bird from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina), known from associated wing elements, is described and its phylogenetic position evaluated and it is named a new taxon Limenavis patagonica.
New Early Cretaceous fossil from China documents a novel trophic specialization for Mesozoic birds
TLDR
The morphology of the skull suggests that Longirostravis had a probing feeding behavior, a specialization previously unknown for Enantiornithes, and provides the first evidence in support of the existence of such a foraging behavior among basal lineages of Mesozoic birds.
MORPHOLOGY, PHYLOGENETIC TAXONOMY, AND SYSTEMATICS OF ICHTHYORNIS AND APATORNIS (AVIALAE: ORNITHURAE)
TLDR
This analysis provided a case study in the application of phylogenetic nomenclature at the species level and evaluated the relationships among Mesozoic ornithurines including Ichthyornis dispar and the newly identified taxa.
Forelimb proportions and the evolutionary radiation of Neornithes
  • R. Nudds, G. Dyke, J. Rayner
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
It is suggested that with further analysis and data collection the relationships between flight behaviour, ecology and BI can be determined and may provide a useful tool for characterizing the ecology of fossil birds.
A Basal Dromaeosaurid and Size Evolution Preceding Avian Flight
TLDR
Change in theropod body size leading to flight's origin was not unidirectional, and the two dinosaurian lineages most closely related to birds, dromaeosaurids and troodontids, underwent four independent events of gigantism, and in some lineages size increased by nearly three orders of magnitude.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...