Inorganic carbon uptake in hydrothermal vent tubeworms facilitated by high environmental pC02

@article{Childress1993InorganicCU,
  title={Inorganic carbon uptake in hydrothermal vent tubeworms facilitated by high environmental pC02},
  author={James J. Childress and Raymond W. Lee and Nancy K. Sanders and Horst Felbeck and Daniel R. Oros and Andr{\'e} Toulmond and Daniel Desbruy{\'e}res and Mahlon C. Kennicutt and James D. Brooks},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1993},
  volume={362},
  pages={147-149}
}
THE marine invertebrate Riftia pachyptila has a remarkable symbiosis with intracellular carbon-fixing sulphide-oxidizing bacteria which was first discovered at 2,450m depth on the Galapagos Rift1–4. Such symbiotic arrangements have since been found in a variety of invertebrate taxa and habitats5,6. Studies of these symbioses have focused on temperature, sulphide and oxygen as critical environmental parameters5,7–9. As Riftia has a high growth rate and its symbionts are far removed from the host… Expand
Inorganic carbon acquisition by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila depends upon high external PCO2 and upon proton-equivalent ion transport by the worm
TLDR
It is hypothesized that Riftia pachyptila is able to support its symbionts' large demand for inorganic carbon owing to the elevated PCO2 in the vent environment and because of its ability to control its extracellular pH in the presence of large inward CO2 fluxes. Expand
Inorganic Carbon and Temperature Requirements for Autotrophic Carbon Fixation by the Chemoautotrophic Symbionts of the Giant Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm, Riftia pachyptila
Riftia pachyptila, the giant hydrothermal vent tube worm, lives in a thermally and chemically complex environment It apparently derives the bulk of its nutrition from its chemoautotrophic symbionts,Expand
Response of hydrothermal vent vestimentiferan Riftia pachyptila to differences in habitat chemistry
Vestimentiferan tubeworms, which rely on intracellular sulfide-oxidizing autotrophic bacteria for organic carbon, flourish at deep-sea hydrothermal vents despite the erratic nature of their habitat.Expand
Carbon dioxide use by chemoautotrophic endosymbionts of hydrothermal vent vestimentiferans: affinities for carbon dioxide, absence of carboxysomes, and δ13C values
TLDR
The strategies for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) use by the symbionts from these two species were examined and transmission electron micrographs showed that R. piscesae lack carboxysomes, irrespective of the coelomic fluid [DIC] of their host. Expand
Metabolite uptake, stoichiometry and chemoautotrophic function of the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Riftia pachyptila: responses to environmental variations in substrate concentrations and temperature
TLDR
While Riftia requires sufficient availability of substrates to support symbiont chemoautotrophic function, it is extremely well poised to buffer the temporal and spatial heterogeneity in environmental substrate concentrations, alleviating the influence of environmental heterogeneity on symbionT chemoAUTOTrophic function. Expand
CO2 Fixation in Chemoautotroph-Invertebrate Symbioses: Expression of Form I and Form II RubisCO
TLDR
The main evidence that the symbionts are autotrophic is the co-occurrence of Gram-negative bacteria and activities of ribulose-l,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) in specific animal tissues. Expand
Sulfide acquisition by the vent worm Riftia pachyptila appears to be via uptake of HS-, rather than H2S.
TLDR
It is shown that the uptake of HS- is the primary mechanism used by R. pachyptila to obtain sulfide and that H2S diffusion into the worm apparently proceeds at a much slower rate than expected. Expand
Biochemical and enzymological aspects of the symbiosis between the deep-sea tubeworm Riftia pachyptila and its bacterial endosymbiont.
Riftia pachyptila (Vestimentifera) is a giant tubeworm living around the volcanic deep-sea vents of the East Pacific Rise. This animal is devoid of a digestive tract and lives in an intimateExpand
Carbonic anhydrase in deep-sea chemoautotrophic symbioses
TLDR
Findings suggest that a CA-based mechanism of carbon uptake may be one of a suite of adaptations to provide symbionts with essential metabolites in algal/invertebrate symbioses. Expand
Dissolved inorganic carbon uptake in Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 is Δp- and ATP-sensitive and enhances RubisCO-mediated carbon fixation
TLDR
Data suggest that a novel, yet to be identified, ATP- and proton potential-dependent DIC transporter is active in this bacterium, which serves to facilitate growth by T. crunogena and other Thiomicrospiras in the many habitats where they are found. Expand
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References

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Sulfide-Driven Autotrophic Balance in the Bacterial Symbiont-Containing Hydrothermal Vent Tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila Jones.
TLDR
Riftia is specialized to provide sulfide to its symbionts with minimal interaction of sulfide with the animal metabolism, facilitated by the sulfide-binding properties of the hemoglobins. Expand
Implications of inorganic carbon utilization: ecology, evolution, and geochemistry
TLDR
The natural occurrence of CO2-concentrating mechanisms is negatively correlated with CO2 enrichment of aquatic habitats from respiration of organic C produced elsewhere and with low temperatures during the growing season, with low external pH, and with rapid water movement over the plant surface. Expand
Sulfide and Carbon Dioxide Uptake by the Hydrothermal Vent Clam, Calyptogena magnifica, and Its Chemoautotrophic Symbionts
TLDR
The symbionts were shown to use sulfide as a substrate for carbon fixation, and the data suggest that they can use thiosulfate, and a general model of the functioning of the symbiosis is presented. Expand
Metabolic and blood characteristics of the hydrothermal vent tube-worm Riftia pachyptila
TLDR
Intact specimens of R. pachyptila (including bacterial symbionts) did not consume significant amounts of CH4 from the environment, and the respiratory quotients, in the absence of added sulfide, indicated that metabolism was mainly heterotrophic. Expand
Calvin-Benson cycle and sulphide oxidation enzymes in animals from sulphide-rich habitats
The role of sulphide oxidation-driven production of reduced carbon in the nutrition of animals adapted to life in sulphide-rich habitats such as the deep-sea hydrothermal vents and intertidalExpand
CO2 Fixation in the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm Riftia pachyptila (Jones)
TLDR
It is proposed that these substances are then transported in the circulatory system of the animals to the bacteria in the trophosome, where malate is decarboxylated and the CO2 released is incorporated in the bacteria. Expand
Stable Carbon Isotopic Evidence for Carbon Limitation in Hydrothermal Vent Vestimentiferans
TLDR
Tissue δ13C values of two species of HTV vestimentiferans increase with increasing size of the animals, which supports the hypothesis that the relatively high δ 13C values are the result of inorganic carbon limitation during carbon fixation. Expand
Chemoautotrophic Potential of the Hydrothermal Vent Tube Worm, Riftia pachyptila Jones (Vestimentifera).
TLDR
Trophosome tissue of the hydrothermal vent tube worm, Riftia pachyptila (Vestimentifera), contains high activities of several enzymes associated with chemoautotrophic existence, consistent with an autotrophic mode of nutrition for this worm, which lives in hydrogen sulfide-rich waters and lacks a mouth and digestive system. Expand
Stable isotopic compositions of hydrothermal vent organisms
TLDR
Nitrogen isotopic analyses show that the food web of the East Pacific Rise community has more trophic levels than the Marianas vent community, suggesting that a 13C-enriched food source is trophically important in both vent communities. Expand
Chemical and biological interactions in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field, Galapagos spreading center
The concentrations of a suite of redox reactive chemicals were measured in the Rose Garden hydrothermal vent field of the Galapagos spreading center. Sulfide, silicate, oxygen and temperatureExpand
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