Innovative trial designs are practical solutions for improving the treatment of tuberculosis.

@article{Phillips2012InnovativeTD,
  title={Innovative trial designs are practical solutions for improving the treatment of tuberculosis.},
  author={Patrick Peter John Phillips and Stephen H. Gillespie and Martin Johan Boeree and Norbert Heinrich and Rob E Aarnoutse and Timothy D. McHugh and Michel Pletschette and Christian Lienhardt and Richard Hafner and Charles S. Mgone and Alimuddin Zumla and Andrew J Nunn and Michael Hoelscher},
  journal={The Journal of infectious diseases},
  year={2012},
  volume={205 Suppl 2},
  pages={
          S250-7
        }
}
A growing number of new drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis are in clinical development. Confirmatory phase 3 trials are expensive and time-consuming and the question of whether one particular drug combination can be used to treat tuberculosis is less important from a public health perspective than the question of which are the shortest, simplest, most effective, and safest regimens. While preclinical and phase 1 studies provide some guidance in the selection of combinations for clinical… 

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