Corpus ID: 40655359

Inner Voice , Target Tracking , and Behavioral Influence Technologies

@inproceedings{McMurtrey2014InnerV,
  title={Inner Voice , Target Tracking , and Behavioral Influence Technologies},
  author={J. McMurtrey},
  year={2014}
}
accessed 8/4/04 at http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet? prog=normal&id=PSISDG003375000001000280000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes 91 Staff. “Hand-held radar device detects breathing, heartbeats” Design News, Jan 19, 1998. Accessed 7/30/04 at http://www.designnews.com/article/CA110182?stt=001&text=hand%2Dheld+radar 92 Raytheon Company, Corporate Communications, 870 Winter Street, Waltham, MA 02451-1449 Accessed 7/30/04 at https://peoiews.monmouth.army.mil/RUS/sensorcat/PDF/EMARS… Expand

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